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would like to present two certificates to you. on behalf of the board of education and the san francisco unified school district. [applause] >> i talked to ester this morning, and i promise i will not take too long. but i will first share my time with two of my outstanding staff members. mrs. jeanna chow and mr. taylor. >> hi, i am jena chou, and i am a kindergarten teacher. i would like to share a few quick reflections. i remember when alice fong yu didn't have enough student and we had to sell the program. and now we don't have to sell the program, in fact we are all sold out. i remember when students went to chinatown to practice the skills and the culture. and now students travel to china to speak the language and live the culture. and none of this it would be without liana szeto. i remember her tireless way to be sure of this success. and determined and still has tireless energy and still have the vision. only now she needs to see it in a slightly larger font. i am -- [laughter] i was going to take that out, but my staff said to keep it in. i am so honored to be a part of alice fong
professional educator defined my professional path. when i recalled this dismissal in those two sentences, i am reminded of the thing that (inaudible) in the intervening years. however these 12 words are not only enough to express the challenges that my team and i have faced, but they stand for our triumphs as well. despite a skeptical and hostile environment, we survived. starting in the 80s with just 25 students started as the first chinese public school opened in san francisco in 1985. as i remember, i remember the quote, which would you teach chinese to them? i try to recall that and to what my colleague said has grown from a small pocket of multi-ethnic students to a student body comprised of many diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. i try to recall how hard we fought, administrator and parents and students and teachers alike. and what we each sacrificed to be be where -- to be where we are today. today i am humbled by my students who excel in two languages and our students are asked to demonstrate their chinese skills. today our graduates go to beijing, china to build bridges using their s
year from elsewhere to kick their education here and who may want to stay here and have jobs here, we should make that easier for them. it is a big debate around a lot of issues. we look forward to working with the administration and congress on that. >> the states have had different reactions to health care reform. some are in the process of forming their own insurance exchanges. other states are leaving it up to the federal government. he proudly each have different perspectives on it. is health reform going to work in 2014 given the responses on the state level to it? >> i know we each address it. i will start. devastates are taking a different approach. one has to do -- different states are taking a different approach. in delaware, we decided to to a state federal partnership after a significant concentration -- consultation. number two, the issue was do we expand medicaid. this was an issue of math. we believe it is a good lesson for us to make sure more people covered through this expansion while at the same time, the federal reimbursement for medicaid increases. number three, t
telling to your member of congress. >> two other things. on the department of education side think they will work on the mess, and hope we do a better job with the servicers reining in the problems. it is important that they have it is important that they have been hearing about this problem so much. that is one thing that does not require congressional action. another thing is the consumer financial protection bureau is sort of the new game in town as far as this goes. people do not think of them as a federal student loan side, they primarily have jurisdiction over private student loans. there will be quite active, talking about some of the predatory practices, but even on the federal student loan side the consumer financial protection bureau has jurisdiction over debt collectors and some of the servicers. it is not the biggest picture issues we have been talking about so much, but on the ground for people right now who have already borrowed, clients like mine having the existing programs that work well, it is incredibly important. hopefully a lot is going to happen in that area.
shows huge role in education, and i look for someone to have impact on me. she educates with fun, she deserving this award because of her passionate input and i would like mr. tim allen to share this award. >> thank you, and good evening board of education and ladies and gentlemen. it is my honor to be here tonight. i get the opportunity to travel throughout california and make presentations at board meetings. and as you can imagine, some of them are quite interesting. but tonight i have a very good feeling about what is going on in this district. and congratulations to you, and what you have done. just seeing these students and the quality of the work they have learned is a testament to what you are doing in this district. i would like to share with you briefly the history of this award. i think it brings more meaning to what we are doing for teac r teache teachers. the carlson family began a company in the late 70s. and they took 5% of their profits and encouraged their employees to go out and work for not-for-profit in the bay area. and they could come back and ask for grants in s
board does, sharing high quality courses that are designed and built upon and refined through educators working together. >> i want to separate these four second. i could not agree with you more that brilliant minds helped shape a common core. as opposed to the construction -- >> it was a combination of mathematicians and educators. if you're making turf courses -- >> we have teacher preparation programs across the country. many of them not the kinds of institutions for which people are recruited. we're trying to get these programs to overhaul what they do. i understand the value of trying to share practices. i am curious. are there other ways to help change what is going on? >> let me pause and celebrate your candor in the following sense. this is the time in a time of limited resources to step out. when people ask what more resources to need to implement it worries me as a question in the sense that we have to learn how to redirect and be more efficient and to get an edge of the few things these standards are asking us to do. i am saying you're right. as a system, producing productive
to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introduction -- no, i get to say someth
, education, and leadership. our president is one of the co-chairs of the council. it is my great pleasure to introduce him this evening. he is a scholar, advocate, and a true friend of afghanistan. pls -- [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction and your work as vice chair of the u.s. afghan women's council. i wish to thank the members from the delegation from afghanistan, u.s. afghan women's council and all of our guests from around the world for joining us this evening. it is a privilege to welcome back to georgetown the president of afghanistan hamid karzai. we look forward to hearing his remark on afghanistan beyond 2014, a perspective on afghan-u.s. relations. 2014 will be an historic year for afghanistan as it will witness elections across the country and the end of u.s. and isaf combat operations. as president obama, secretary of state clinton and many of this room have emphasized this transition provides us with the opportunity for diplomatic and cultural relations between our peoples. at georgetown, we are proud to be a part of this critical work notably through th
to dozens of schools where there were dramatic gains that were maintained. >> "the education of michelle rhee." fr in ontlise made possie by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. additional funding for this program is provided by: >> michelle rhee's journey to national prominence began in 2007. washington dc had just inaugurated a new mayor, adrian fenty. he had won a landslide election and promised to fix the district's abysmal school system. >> the lack of real opportunity for young people drives our unemployment rate, it drives our crime rate, and we can't have that. this is the nation's
of a strong-handed role in sort of picking winners and losers in determining who gets educated and how they get educated -- those forms of capitalism seem to be gaining the upper hand in the global debate. and i think we have to recognize that if we don't address the flaws in our own system like the flaws associated with inequality or the inability to create jobs or the free rein given to big investors at the expense of everybody else, we're going to lose our influence, the model's going to change, and we're going to be at a disadvantage. >> host: what's china doing right? >> guest: well, they're growing fast. that helps. by 2030, you know, china's second biggest economy in the world right now. we think of it as an exporting economy, but really their growth has been internal. by 2030, which is not that long away although it sounds far away, they'll be the world's largest consumer economy. they'll be the ones setting the trend in terms of what a car is like and what a washing machine is like can and what an ipad is like. but they're also building more cities than anybody else. they're g
schools. i went into all of my schools. >> one of his schools was noyes education campus. >> when i went into noyes i was very impressed. >> a typical inner city school, noyes was an example of what rhee hoped to accomplish. the year before she arrived, its principal, wayne ryan, had raised test scores in reading and math over 20 points. >> he said he was going to make the same gains this year as they did last year. >> no, if we made the samewe gains, the chancellor's going to take my entire staff out to dinner. >> rhee was so impressed by ryan's success that she featured him in this recruitment ad. >> you were like a poster child. >> good morning, everyone. >> standardized tests like the dc cas, which ryan had used at noyes, were mandated in 2002 by a federal law called no child left behind. their scores enabled federal officials to measure progress at individual schools. >> now, how many of you know about no child left behind? what does that law say? it basically says that by the year 2014, every child in the united states should be proficient in english and in mathematics. >> poor sco
on traditional liberal arts education. . >> woodruff: ray suarez looks into china's current crackdown on the internet and on its own news media, which is drawing protests. >> ifill: and we remember pulitzer prize-winning journalist richard ben cramer, whose work spanned presidential politics and the lives of superstar athletes. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: saving for the heart. you'll be able to get close to iconic landmarks. to cultural places. it's a feeling that you can only get. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world viking river cruises, explore the world >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank y. >> woodruff: the renewed concern over mass shootings
find more places to cut spending without short-changing things like education, job training, research and technology all of which is critical. spending cuts must be balanced with more reforms to our tax code. the wealthiest individuals and the biggest corporations should not be able to take advantage of loopholes that are not available to most americans. as i said earlier, one thing i won't compromise over is whether or not congress should pay the tab for a bill they have already racked up. congress refused to give the united states the money to pay the bill on time the consequences could be catastrophic. our familieses and our businesses account no afford that dangerous game again. i congratulation the newly sworn members of congress and i look forward working with the new congress in a bipartisan way. if we focus on the interest of our country above the interest of our party i'm convinced we can cut spending and we can protect the middle class. we can step up to meet the important business that awaits us this year, creating jobs, fixing our infrastructure and our immigration system.
transportation to education, to preserving the capabilities of our national guard. while each governor has his or her own unique circumstances, we all have to facilitate job growth, improve schools, and be financially responsible. as much as we do in our states, our economies are tightly linked to the national economy, and as a result, our state's prosperity, the prosperity of our citizen depends in no small measure on the ability of all public servants in washington to come together on a path forward. uncertainty here in federal support hurts both our economies and the federal budget, and the implications are incredibly important. governors have been working with the president, the vice president, and congressional leadership to find solutions to help put our country back on firm financial footing. one of the largest elements of the uncertainty concerned elements of the fiscal cliff that were either postponed or taken out of the reason -- recent relief act of 2012 as the only postponed reducing grants to states. intimate reform was not addressed, and no action was taken regarding the federal
education these days is the recent explosion of free online courses. universities are grappling with their impact on teaching and liberal arts education. newshour corresondent spencer michels has our story. >> mark this with d and in a valueive the term you mark with e. >> reporter: tracy lippincott, who works in a san francisco bar, is taking a college course in her apartment, online, on how to reason and argue. the teacher is walter sinnott- armstrong, professor of ethics at duke university in north carolina, and the class is free. >> so how do you learn the technique? the answer is very simple. you practice, and then you practice again, and then you practice and practice and practice and practice. this class has these really short little lectures, which is great because you can kind of watch one, and then think about it and react, and then you don't have to watch another whole hour like you would in class. >> reporter: "think again" is a class presented by a one-year- old for-profit startup called coursera, currently the nation's largest provider of free online courses. 170,0
and replenish our beaches. our department of education has worked night and day to get schools reopened right away, and where that wasn't possible, to get them restored by the next school year, all while maintaining our commitment to a full 180-day school year of education for our kids. executive order 107 makes sure that when insurance payments do come, they are not compromised by excessive deductibles and ensures that our citizens maximize their reimbursement. while there are dozens of other examples of the never quit attitude of this administration and our citizens, there is none better than the miracle of route 35 in mantoloking. at the mantoloking bridge, route 35 had been completely washed away by sandy. i stood at the spot where the atlantic ocean flowed into the bay where route 35 once carried thousands of cars a day to vacations down the shore. within days, commissioner jim simpson, the department of transportation and our private sector partners had a temporary road built to allow emergency vehicles onto the island. now, merely 10 weeks after our state's worst storm, you see a perma
-ups, we are taking steps to make sure conn leads again. when it came to education, the stakes were clear. take action together or risk losing an entire generation of young people to failing schools and a widening achievement gap. i am proud that after a long and hard debate, we were able to say with one voice, that the status quo was no locker acceptable. that when it comes to public education, we cannot keep doing what we have always done and simply hope for better results. that our kids cannot afford it and our state cannot afford it as well. we work with an eye towards a future and have made an historic investment of nearly $100 million from three k to high- school, focusing on those districts that are most in need. reaching kids early is critical to the success and early childhood education had to be a central portion of our education reform. so we created 1000 new school readiness opens statewide for youngsters at a time when no one thought that it was possible. that is 1000 more children that will show up to kindergarten this fall ready to learn. we did that together, and we will d
not addressing the costs of education at all. it is about increasing government funding to help students go to school. we need to be focusing on and we need to be focusing on what are the costs that can be reduced to bring these costs down, make schools more competitive, so students have a competitive choice of which university to go to. >> we will let you go, as we hear from traunch mitchell. -- josh mitchell. >> a lot of schools are starting to increase things at a faster pace. i think there is so much scrutiny these days. it is kind of like health care. why are costs rising? i think they're going to start to see a lot of pressure from congress to rein in their costs. >> josh mitchell writes for "the wall street journal," and thanks for spending the last half hour with us. >> yes. >> and we appreciate all of your phone calls, comments on twitter, and the conversation continues online, and the question we have been asking is, how much debt is worth going into college? [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013
student who's determined to help young people around the world get a higher education. >>> for decades ethnic minorities from myanmar fled conflict with the former military government to seek refuge in thailand. for many refugee camps are the only home they've ever known. they grew up and went to school in the camps, learning their own ethnic language. but with reconciliation under way in myanmar, educators face a new challenge. how to prepare for the day when the refugees can go home. nhk world's toshiyuki terazawa has the story. >> reporter: children attend an elementary school at the refugee camp in thailand, near the border with myanmar. the camp houses ethnic -- who have left myanmar. refugees have lived in this camp for decades. over the time children have grown up being educated in their native language. refugee leaders created their own education program with the support of organizations including the united nations. this is one of the people responsible. her group set up some 150 schools from nurseries to colleges at seven refugee camps in thailand. >> nearly over 60 years we
. >>> the pakistani teenager nearly killed for her push for girls' education rights now back with her family, but will she be returning to pakistan to continue her fight? the latest on malhala's story coming up. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. take long. i'm done. are you thinking what i'm thinking? ♪ give me just a little more time ♪ okay. all right. oh! [ female announcer ] the 2-in-1 swiffer sweeper uses electrostatic dry cloths to clean better than a broom. and its wet mopping cloths can clean better than a mop in half the time so you don't miss a thing. mom, have you seen my -- hey! hey! he did it. [ female announcer ] swiffer. better clean in half the time. or your money back. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you g
is a massive public education campaign for parents and educators. for people about how to use these tools responsibly. >> we are still adapting as a society and learning what it means to be exposed due to the way we track our lives and share information online. and i do agree with that. that's part of the problem here, getting everyone educated. >> right now employers are saying, all right, if you want a job come you have to tell us your password so we can go on your private website. >> the bottom line is there are laws governing employment in the united states. there are certain things an employer can ask and certain things they cannot pass. an employer cannot ask marital status. an employer cannot use that information against you in a hiring decision. >> but how do you prove that? >> we need additional loss? i don't know. there are laws on the books right now. once we had it last summer opened my eyes to a lot of information that employers can gather on people. there is a startup company who is running their business like the way a credit reporting agency runs their business. so what th
killed by the taliban for promoting girls' education was released from the hospital today. the attack in october led to worldwide condemnation, and an outpouring of sympathy for her cause. nbc's keir simmons has more tonight. >> reporter: malala walking from the hospital today. a strong woman, her doctors say, making excellent progress. in pictures released by the hospital, the affection of her nurses is evident. >> i think it's fantastic news she has come out of the hospital. and it's actually particularly a relief to her family. >> reporter: family members in the uk have visited regularly but doctors decided living with them would help her recovery. >> they were finding it difficult to properly educate her in the hospital. so they wanted her to be even more with the family, because only father and mother were allowed every day. >> reporter: just three months ago in pakistan, malala was near death, shot in the head by the taliban. they were angered by her campaign for women's education. >> if you can help us, please help. >> reporter: instead of killing her, they made this teenage gi
perspectives on all sorts of issues including economics, education, the environment. i think you'll see a lot of different thoughts and ideas on how to get things done and how to find compromise. host: how does a play out with women in leadership roles? guest: we have a new number of women serving on committees and shares. barbara mikulski is the first women's chair of the appropriations committee. how that will change, we will see. we have more and more -- patty murray, dianne feinstein. these are significant changes. very interesting on the house side. we have seven women ranking on major committees and the house. the house republicans have zero women cheering any major committees. they are all white men and have one woman chairing a minor committee and that is the administration committee. we feel we are in a great place. froml see a lot of work emily's list to get the majority of back in the house. host: what role did your organization plate in the election of these women? guest: we are in it for the long haul. emily's list has been working with some women since they were in the state leg
and killed. >> in tonight's education alert, for the fifth consecutive year, maryland ranked the no. 1 school system in the nation according to "education week" magazine. tim tooten has the story we first brought you today. this is getting to be old hat, isn't it? >> martineau mallee -- martin o'malley taking on critics of the school's success. >> we students show our appreciation by working hard. >> it was a celebration of the state's new ranking at the jones elementary school. that is when governor martin o'malley showed up to celebrate. >> as a result of our top choices, maryland public schools have been named for the fifth year in a row the number one public schools in america. maryland received an overall grade of b-plus. an a for transition and alignment, which tests college readiness and childhood education. a b for maths. among other grades, a b for k-12 achievement, which tracks all students perform on national tests. a b for standards, assessments, and accountability programs. >> it is just wonderful. is -- it is historic for our educators. >> maryland is among those celebrating the
advisory commission, comprised of experts in mental health, education, law enforcement, and first response. we may never know what motivated the events at sandy hook elementary, but that won't stop us from working to prevent future tragedy. over the coming months, the commission will come together to make specific, actionable recommendations in the areas of school safety, mental health services, and gun violence prevention. this session, i know there will be others that take action on these issues, and i applaud those efforts. the more resources we can bring to bear on this issue, the better. working together we can and will affect real change. there are some things we know already. we know that we must find ways to better respond to those with mental health needs. as a society, we have an obligation to take action in a meaningful way when a person seeks our help or demonstrates a need for it. we must balance our respect for individual rights with our obligation to provide for the greater public safety. and when it comes to preventing future acts of violence in our schools, let me say this
for those of innovation that can help shift the task to work being done by educated eco-and the interface between service provider and community and increase the demand. but if we don't ship to innovation, way. >> i should clarify for audience that the human immune system i very specifically targeted by the hiv virus. so as your cd-4 count goes down, you're headed for his part said the case of the disease. we have time for one more question. i think i sought and stars of family care international but air. >> thanks, laurie. i wanted to ask if you could, specifically in what you see as priorities and transcendent possibilities in sub-saharan africa, the region where the problem of hiv/aids is most severe in terms of population and in particular from the perspective of the long-term potential and the question of the most strategic approach in terms of dealing with hava is more or less of it or to publish your integrate cnet with the provision of basic health services, reproductive, newborn and maternal services, what you see is the most appropriate strategy for dealing with this in africa.
was an administrator in north carolina and was the national alliance of black school educators superintendent of the year. we have elizabeth celania-fagen -- liz fagen, douglas county superintendent of schools. she was superintendent of tucson unified. a beacon of education reform by arne duncan. david coleman, president of the college board. he co-founded student achievement partners. he was recognized as one of 11 education act of this. he was new school change agent of the year. he has set a high bar. always a mistake. john deasy, los angeles unified superintendent of schools, second largest system in the country. he was deputy director of education for the bill and melinda gates foundation. he is remembered as the hard- charging superintendent of the prince george's county schools. we have joanne weiss, chief of duncan. army duncane she ran the race to the top program, getting that off to a widely heralded start. ceo at the new schools venture fund. let's get this started. lost angeles is wrestling with a number of challenges. there are concerns about the reform. of where does it intersec
for education certainly. annette has more now from sacramento governor brown says the budget deficit has been wiped out. and per pupil spending will go up almost 2700 dollars by 2016 under controversial proposal to give schools more money if they have higher numbers of low income and non-english speaking students. >> growing up in compton or richmond is not like it is to grow up in los gatos or beverly history or piedmont. >>reporter: higher education will see bump of 2000 dollars or so per student in the same time period. all thanks to rebounding economy and california voters for approving the tax hike under proposition 30 last november. >> they voted for the tax measure. putting money natural schools as i said but we are also not going to play the game of spending money we didn't vishtion the budget plan includes 1 billion dollar rainy day fund while democrat like the blue print proposal also drew cautious praise from republic kaichbilitys i think the governor deserves credit for advance ago budget plan that gemly imposes fiscal restraint when we need it. >>reporter: some were disappoi
resources. it means fighting in the areas of education for the population so that they can work with determination to make their contribution to rebuilding their respective economies. success knows no frontiers. my term of office will be dedicated, among other things, to getting haitians into the schools, to keeping up the fight against corruption, to establishing the rule of law, and my hope and trust is that the results will, within less than two years. more than 1 million children who read and loved by the wayside now have free access to education. -- who were left by the wayside now have free access to education. the effort for reconstruction is already paying off. more than 1 million homeless people finding accommodation, and part of these benefits have come from taxpayers. i say to them that all of our strategies and their solidarity has not been wasted. those that are most formidable are the ones that have benefited the most. -- most vulnerable are the ones then have benefited the most. there is taking shape in front of our eyes that the institutions have been filled. the
to buy up housing. >> neil: it went into cash for clunkers and education, exactly. >> now, we're paying for it. and greenberg has a good case on his hands and i wish him god's speed. >> neil: meanwhile, did you hear about this. the mother of 14 reportedly back on welfare after spending her savings on rehab but the octomom, but it's growing faster than the entire pop laying of the united states. where does it end? in less than four hours from now on fox business network, get ready because after you hear what we've discovered. you will never watch bill o'reilly again. [ laughter ] >> all right. politicians can't take the heat. maybe it's time to get the heck out of kitchen. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could switchgrass in argentina, change engineering in dubai, aluminum production in south africa, and the aerospace industry in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investm
was campaigning for girls to be educated. and jeremy has this report. >> a remarkable recovery, hard to believe as she walked out of a hospital. her survival was against the odds, the extent of her recovery delighted the medical staff. she says a thank-you to the nurses and doctors here. she is off to a temporary home that they have set up. something of a normal life after so much pain and separation. >> she could talk, it was a good side of her brain had not been damaged. ha >> going to school, the same right to education. her case has attracted worldwide coverage and support. >> the genuinely an inspiration for millions of other people around the world as well. the world did stand up. >> she was rushed to hospital and it became clear that the bullet wound needed a more sophisticated life-saving treatment. the teenager was brought to birmingham. with her family at her side, she has been talking, walking, ready to go home. in a few weeks, she will be back here for major reconstructive surgery on her skull. but for now, a moment of joy, looking forward to a future that did not seem possible just
was shot in the head. her crime was campaigning for girls to be educated. and jeremy has this report. >> a remarkable recovery, hard to believe as she walked out of a hospital. her survival was against the odds, the extent of her recovery delighted the medical staff. she says a thank-you to the nurses and doctors here. she is off to a temporary home that they have set up. something of a normal life after so much pain and separation. >> she could talk, it was a good side of her brain had not been damaged. ha >> going to school, the same right to education. her case has attracted worldwide coverage and support. >> the genuinely an inspiration for millions of other people around the world as well. the world did stand up. >> she was rushed to hospital and it became clear that the bullet wound needed a more sophisticated life-saving treatment. the teenager was brought to birmingham. with her family at her side, she has been talking, walking, ready to go home. in a few weeks, she will be back here for major reconstructive surgery on her skull. but for now, a moment of joy, looking forward
e-mail etiquette or learn to not apply to yobs by - m. john? >> what about the educational system that encourages them to not get themselves in damaging experiences and documents on line. but think more. it is a solution to help better kid's repitations . >> -- reputations. >> what do you want to see in the potential hires john? >> i am worried about a person that is motivated. if you don't have a motivated person. hire them to be motivated. you twitter has a lot of people in trouble. employers have to show since, too. these are kids being kids. >> thank you everyone. coming up. america's best days are behind us. that is it what 50 percent of the americans are now saying. what someone here says they are 100 percent wrong. the best is yet to come. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur >> hello eeverybody. i am yuma inn
mentioned. perhaps better voter education about the tools that are out there to help them know where they need to vote, more staffing at the polling places where a captain or assistant captain could actually go through the front lines, the czech and lines to interface with the voters, say has anyone -- checkin lines to interface with the voters, say has anyone got any questions? i can check for you. that has become a real issue with all of the precincts. so come up voter education might be part of it, and i think early voting has law lot of voters into thinking "i can vote anywhere." and the only races they care about will be counted and in some cases the lower level races, they may be upset about. but it is like a shrug it for them and they say, oh, well. i think some of the lower races, some of the ballot initiatives, the more localized issues -- there might be a real problem in the end. so. >> thank you. i have a few things that have been touched on by almost everybody here. just to the voters, about being prepared. i know in arlington county, you can go on the web site. it tells
at the deficit problem. it gives $2.7 billion from education through kindergarten through community college. the systems will get an additional $250 million each. it expands healthcare under the healthcare reform and leaves a billion dollars in reserve. the governor's plan to increase public education funding also includes social engineering, poorer districts will get more than other ones. david louie has more. >> west contra costa knows hardship. they got a $46 million bailout and laid off teachers long before the budget crisis. now it has paid off the loan it is getting a shot in the arm. in announcing $2.7 billion in increased funding for public education. >> in richmond, it's not like growing up in los gatos or beverly hills. >> they want to give those hire amounts. julie says it's critical because 70% of the 30,000 students are minority, some of them are still learning english. >> you have to understand that education is the foundation for everything. without that money, without that foundation, we're going to see problems in the future. so fixing it now helps. >> reporter: school dist
of mental health, education, for example, are part of this problem and need to be addressed as part of the effort that vice-president biden is undertaking. >> of some supporters say there are about freedom and control, it's not the answer. >> bad guys are not stupid, they're just bad. if their intent on doing something bad it will get a firearm and use it. >> they can also be used for protection. a mother at home with her twins fire her 38 caliber revolver when ex-convict broke into their home in the room where there were hiding when the man. the newly elected pro-second amendment senate democrat is worried about overreaching. >> said think you need to put everything on the table, but what i hear from the administration, that is weight in the extreme of what i think is necessary or even should be talked about, and it is not going to pass. >> an associated press analysis reveals there was a huge increase in background checks for gun sales and permits at the end of 12. in colorado following the or a movie theater shooting in the connecticut after the sandy hook school shooting, there
of the time. we need to do everything we've been doing with the economy, education, etc. we also need to address the plague and scourge of gun violence. we need to address hurricane sandy. so, yes, it is an aggressive agenda. it is a lot of work. but they elect us to lead, my friends. we will. they elect us to perform and we will. we have proven that we can lead. we have proven that we can perform. we know that with these challenges at hand that is exactly what we must now do. we have daunting challenges. no doubt. but these challenges also pose exciting opportunities. yes, it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems, i know the issues. but, can you imagine how smart this state would be when we actually educate all our children to the best of the god given potential. when every black child and every white child and every urban child is educated to their full potential. i know helping the economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at ful
's behalf. >> california schools are digging deeper to soldther cost of special education -- shoulder the cosof special education -- cost of special education. the report shows the cost to educate a student with disabilities has gone up but state and federal funding remained flat. >>> coming up, we told you about a woman's concern about burglaries in her neighborhood, what happened today. >> and a milestone, why analysts are calling it the biggest change for healthcare in decades.
of the discussion. we've got federal, state and local policy makers, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he
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